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In-water Adventures = Happiness (Part 2)

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This blog is part 2 of a three-part blog about experiences from adventures in Eua, Tonga.  See also Experience #1: Pod of Five and Experience #3: Mother and Calf.


 

Experience #2: Cathedral Cave

Cathedral entrance
Cathedral entrance

Eua is quite different to the other islands in Tonga, it has been formed from up-lifted limestone with impressions of ancient coral often clearly visible in the rocks.  It is also the oldest island in Tonga, and the highest.

The island also has a surrounding plateau, much of which sits between low and high tide.  A number of underwater caves have formed in this plateau, many of which are waiting to be fully explored.  The most well-known is the Cathedral Cave, reportedly the largest of its kind in the southern hemisphere.

Entry to the Cathedral is from the ocean through a wide arch at a depth of 20 - 25m.  Once inside, the cave opens up into a large cavern with several ‘skylights’ in the roof, which appear like ‘blue holes’ when viewed from the cliffs above.

Although there is light inside the cave it is a true overhead environment with no safe entry or exit through the skylights.

Cathedral_2

 

Despite any swell and ocean noise outside the cave, inside the water is calm and silent and light streams down from the roof in beams as if coming through blue stained-glass windows.  When passing under the first few skylights no imagination is required to work out how this cave got its name.

In the main cavern area the waves roll over the skylights in a fascinating display, it’s like watching thunder clouds rolling across the sky in a dramatic time-lapse video.  Then with each cycle of ebb and flow of the waves above mini-tornado whirlpools reach down into the cave – it’s best to stay below all of the turbulence and just enjoy the show.

Cathedral_3

This was our fourth trip to Eua and fourth dive into the Cathedral Cave but this time we had no dive-leader responsibilities.  It was a chance to enjoy, to photograph the beams of light and to float on my back in mid-water, face-up tank-down, watching the mesmerising display in the skylights above.

It's a happy place.

Words can never capture the feeling of being there, so I'll let the photos help in explaining.

Cathedral skylights
Under lights - Karen in her XDeep Ghost

It doesn’t matter if you believe in simple geology or something more, the Cathedral Cave in Eua is a truly special place that will only ever be known to divers.

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